Cubicle Blues

What's up? Discuss, confide, laugh, cry....

Moderator: Mauveduh

Post Reply
User avatar
Mauveduh
Board Moderator
Board Moderator
Posts: 1866
Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2003 5:18 pm

Cubicle Blues

Post by Mauveduh » Tue Jun 07, 2005 1:51 am

I'm going to work in an office this week for the first time in awhile. I have to do some work on-site and may do it regularly for a period of time. It's tough to face that. I have a mental block against it. I think it feels like I'm going back into the 9 to 5 corporate world where I'm controlled by the next rung in the ladder and I start to panic. I'll probably be like a rat in a cage and keep pacing around the perimiter, looking for a way out. LOL

I keep telling myself it's not the same and it's temporary. It's like those phobias that don't adhere to logic and take on a life of their own in your mind.

I avoided it for a good part of my life and always told myself that I could never be one to spend my days in an office working for someone else. Then I did it, and finally got into a routine and maintained that life for years. There was some security that routine, to a point. Once I got out, it really hit me how difficult it was to do that every day. I can't see myself doing that again. I can work in an office, but it's having to be there every day, all day and keep that pace going constantly that I that I can't bare.

Even working twice as many hours, but managing my time is better than working a predetermined, neverending routine for me. I've been reconsidering that thought at times and wanting to work less, but I still don't know if I could make that trade.

I choose neither. ;-) On to plan c.
Moderator
~-~-~-~-~
You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.--Mark Twain

User avatar
webwriter
Posts: 1334
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2004 12:54 pm
Contact:

Post by webwriter » Tue Jun 07, 2005 3:25 am

I can relate. Five years ago, I worked in one of McGraw-Hill's cubicles, aka "workspaces" and hated every minute of it. The work was monotonous and everything had to be done by yesterday. There were also long waiting times of several hours. I even bought one of those calendars that featured pictures of things made of common objects, such as crackers, that had to be "found" and identified as such.

So I feel for you, I really do.

The only consolation is that your situation is temporary, at least for the time being. Good luck!

User avatar
maico886
Posts: 72
Joined: Thu Nov 06, 2003 2:16 pm

Post by maico886 » Thu Jun 09, 2005 8:06 am

There is something to be said for security but, I hear you, I've never been more stressed than when working for someone else.
When I began working for myself, I stopped having stomach problems, I was much more relaxed even though I am in what's perceived as being a high stress job.
I think it creates a daily challenge that some people seem to need. The challenge of getting up every day to the thought "What do I need to do to make money today?"
It's interesting, some of us thrive on that while others have just the opposite experience.
I guess we were just born to be wild:):) ~!@

User avatar
webwriter
Posts: 1334
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2004 12:54 pm
Contact:

Post by webwriter » Thu Jun 09, 2005 8:20 am

You've hit the nail right on the head, Maico! I agree with everything that you said, and would also like to add that a few of those challenges can be really difficult at times. For example, say that for a given month, you're scraping the bottom of the barrel to pay the mortgage and an estimated tax bill and are being hounded by a utility to pay a whopping bill, or else. All of this is hard to take and enough to make a weak person cave. It is also a time in which priorities must be set, such as paying that mortgage and tax bill off first, and working something out for the utility bill.

User avatar
Mauveduh
Board Moderator
Board Moderator
Posts: 1866
Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2003 5:18 pm

Post by Mauveduh » Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:31 am

You are also right about being stressed more when working for someone else. Part of that is trying fit someone else's agenda, figure out what they want and supply it in a way that they will recognize that it fit's their agenda. That's tough. You are always running on some else's energy and that is unsettling. It seems like a job is more secure than being independent but there is no security in that either.

When you are on your own, and provide a service, you still have to cater to others but it's different. You plan your strategy the way that feels natural for yourself. You are also accountable to yourself and can fail and not get that paycheck to pay those bills. But it's a different kind of stress and though the stakes may be higher, it's somehow easier to deal with.

I think it's the freedom factor and the ability to make choices. There is a battle of priorities every minute of the day and you can decide to throw things aside and do something else. I hate the fact that I have to make money. It's my least favorite thing to do. I have to force myself to get try to remember that I have to do that. I think I was a queen in a past life and I had servants to take care of me. It's such an annoyance to have to make a living. LOL.

Actaully, I love to work, but it's the money part that I don't want to do.

I deal with it though, as a matter of necessity. Some people love that part. Look at Donald Trump. I'm working on getting in that mode more for awhile. Unfortunately, money buys freedom. It's all about how you look at it. I just have to make it look like fun in my mind and get an attitude adjustment.

Get your motor runnin'.... Born to be wiiiild.
Moderator
~-~-~-~-~
You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.--Mark Twain

User avatar
webwriter
Posts: 1334
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2004 12:54 pm
Contact:

Post by webwriter » Fri Jun 10, 2005 4:26 am

Robert Kiyosaki, author of Rich Dad, Poor Dad, asserted that money is an idea. In other words, visualize that you already have a specific amount such as a million, for example. After all, you've really earned it by doing the greatest amount of good for the greatest amount of people. Kiyosaki named Ford, Getty, Dell, Gates as people who became very rich. For example, Ford made the automobile available to everyday people, not just the rich. And Kiyosaki himself became rich by sharing strategies that people could use to become wealthy. He made a good point about doing the greatest good for the greatest numbers of people, though. That's why it may be good to examine trends and peoples' problems for a way to help.

User avatar
Mauveduh
Board Moderator
Board Moderator
Posts: 1866
Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2003 5:18 pm

Post by Mauveduh » Thu Jun 16, 2005 12:59 am

I agree that everything is an idea and visualizing anything is an important key to making it happen. It takes energy in that direction. I would much rather put my energy into creating art or looking at those trends but there's where that visualizing concept comes in. Making money is an art to some.

It always comes back to perception being everything. Things are always more fun when you get to be inventive and think out-of-the-box. Finding a unique niche does sound intrigueing as well as creative, so I know enjoyment can coexist with monetary gain. I just haven't perceived the right combination of both simultaneously, YET! But I get glimpses of it now and then, and I'm working on it.
Moderator
~-~-~-~-~
You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.--Mark Twain

Hatedtard

Post by Hatedtard » Mon Nov 13, 2006 9:59 am

EDITED

User avatar
webwriter
Posts: 1334
Joined: Thu Jan 22, 2004 12:54 pm
Contact:

Post by webwriter » Mon Nov 13, 2006 1:38 pm

Not "hatedtard," but RETARD for posting the same spam in another forum. Why don't you admit that you're a spammer? Oh, that's right. You're RETARDED!!!!!

Post Reply