He couldda' beena contender-good-bye Marlon

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He couldda' beena contender-good-bye Marlon

Post by Mauveduh » Fri Jul 02, 2004 4:29 pm

Marlon Brando has passed on. He certainly was an icon for those great classeic movies of the 50's and coined so many phrases that we have used for years. He was also a director. I remember seeing Mutiny on the Bounty. What a powerful movie for us, not to mention him. It changed his life.

And then there was the Godfather.

This is just a partial list of his contributrions. Can you think of any more of his movies?

A Streetcar Named Desire
On the Waterfront
Mutiny on the Bounty
The Young Lions
Julius Caesar
The Missouri Breaks
Morituri
Desiree
The Appaloosa
Reflections in a Golden Eye
Burn!
The Teahouse of the August Moon
Bedtime Story
The Fugitive Kind
Ugly American
A Countess from Hong Kong
Night of the Following Day
Viva Zapata!
Guys and Dolls
The Wild One
Cowboy Justice
The Great American Western
The Law and the Lawless
The Score
Apocalypse Now Redux
Free Money
Bed Of Roses/ Don Juan de Marco
The Island of Dr. Moreau
Christopher Columbus - The Discovery
The Freshman
A Dry White Season
The Formula
Apocalypse Now
Roots - The Next Generations
Superman: The Movie
Last Tango in Paris
The Nightcomers
Candy
The Men
A Countess From Hong Kong


He was like a James Dean rebel personality that we will never forget.

We will never forget you, Mr. Brando.....
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Post by Mauveduh » Fri Jul 02, 2004 8:08 pm

I got inspired with this subject. The movie, The Wild One, with Marlon Brando, was inspired by an event that took place near an area where I live, called Hollister, CA. I'ts a few miles inland from here and where my son goes to ride his bikes on the tracks of the Hollister Hills. My brother, a weekend warrior: businessman by day, motocrycle racer by night, also rides there.

This event eerily corresponds with the passing of Marlon Brando on this July 4th celebration. I was inspired to write a brief article on the event and the historical circumstances surrounding it. I'm in the process of that now and avoiding writing about what I am supposed to be writing about. That always helps with inspiration.

Here is part 1:

Dubbed a "motorcycle riot" by the press in 1947, an event took place in the small CA town of Hollister that would spur a chain of events that would change the landscape of history and the image of motorcycling forever. The event was depicted in Stanley Kramer's 1953 film, The Wild One, starring Marlon Brando and Lee Marvin.

Hovering between myth and reality, the “outlaw biker” label culminated in this event and Hollister became known as "The Birthplace of the American Biker".

Hollister, a small, farmland town a few miles off the central CA coast, was named after pioneer and cattle rancher Joseph Hubbard Hollister, after driving his herd accross the plains to California in 1853.

Through the 1930's, Hollister had been the site of a series of popular races, sanctioned by the American Motorcyclist Association, called the Gypsy Tour. At that time, this sleepy town boasted a population of 4,500. Their Memorial Day races became a much anticipated, yearly event that kept the town alive as a source of revenue for local merchants.

This ended for a time, with the outbreak of WW11, but was brought to life again in 1947, after many ex-servicemen found themselves living in the west with a bit of extra cash. They were looking more excitement than a house, family and steady job could provide. After fighting a war, it’s hard to come back to the mediocrity and conform to a life without a little action-filled recreation.

What is more exciting than feeling the wind in your hair as you speed across the plains in wild abandon on the “iron horses” called motorcycles? These defenders of our freedom found their niche in the comfort of being part of an organized unit, once again. They had been plucked from their teams of platoons in the war, and now formed many small motorcycle clubs where they could gather to keep that unity alive. These pioneers became the cowboys of that time, and the town of Hollister became the Wild West.

The Gypsy Tour, brought motorcyclists from California, Arizona and Oregon, and some from as far away as Florida to the small CA town for their annual race. It was reported to attract as many as 12,000 persons, according to official reports, though a more accurate number was said to be closer to 4,000.

These bikers had come a long way and were ready to have some fun. The town welcomed them and was ready to cash in the revenue of this event as they had done before the war. But with the ravages of war, comes change. Warriors are bread to fight and face danger and death in the face. It can drive you to drink more and feel alienated from those who have not experienced these life-altering events.

These visitors were having fun as they knew how, with their bikes, and were fueled with alcohol. They rode their bikes right into the taverns, burned rubber on the streets as they popped their wheelies and had races of their own down the main street of the town. It was all in good fun in their eyes. After 3 days of this “fun”, they were driven out of town by police action and teargas.

The event saturated the media with sensationalized accounts of the incident and thus began it’s far-reaching consequences. Here’s an exert from the San Francisco Chronicle at that time.

“HOLLISTER. July, 5 (1947) State Highway patrolmen tonight imposed informal martial law in downtown Hollister to curb the riotous activities of an estimated 4000. Almost 60 persons were injured, three of them seriously. Several more arrests were made and a special night court session was convened to punish those charged with reckless driving and drunkenness. The outburst of terrorism - wrecking of bars, bottle barrages into the streets from upper story windows and roofs and high speed racing of motorcycles though the streets - came as participants in the annual "Gypsy Tour" sponsored by the American Motorcycle Association converged on Hollister for a three-day meeting.”

Today, this small town of only 25,000 residents expects to bring a flood of visitors of over 200,000 to commemorate the event.

The town was torn when merchants actually wanted the bikers back to fuel their economy. On the other hand, towns across the country read the press coverage and were canceling races in fear of a similar circumstance with the new branding of these perceived "outlaws". Motorcyclists became known as sociopathic misfits to be feared.

To be continued shortly..... I'm still writing but need a short break. I haven't proof read it yet.
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Post by Mauveduh » Fri Jul 02, 2004 10:04 pm

Here's a side note about my writing break. I had ventured outside earlier to do a little gardening in my attemp to procrastinate on my deadline of writing several art-related papers that are due NOW.

I had to go out and add those piles of weeds to the recycling bin in the dark. I decided to get a rake and tried the door of my house. It was locked. I had locked myself out of my house with no way in. I checked all of the doors and windows and searched my car for a key. NOTHING! The only way in was through a second story sliding glass door that was open to the deck. I saw no way of getting up there. It was straight up.

After weighing my null options, other than calling a locksmith, I borrowed a flashlight from a neighbor and tried to climb the wall. I just happen to have an injury right now and can't use my arms to pull my weight so it seemed even more impossible. I piled up anything I could find on the deck and tried to climb. But I could not get around having to pull myself up. The pain was too much to continue. I pulled a spider filled box to the top of the table to give me more height and finally made it to the bar that held my satellite dish.

I managed to use my arms to pull as much as possible and needed to fit through the narrow slats that bordered the deck. I twisted and turned and finally made it halfway through but then my bottom half got stuck. It seemed like it wouldn't fit through. Then I felt a surging pain in my neck as my whole side cramped up with my unnatural position. I couldn't move and the pain was intense. You know what those cramps feel like and you can't make it stop.

I remained still until I could move again and started maneuvering my way through the opening. Like a miracle, I actually managed to slither through and get to that door.

I went to retrieve the flashlight and was on my way back to the front of my house and was startled by someone standing there. I screamed as that person also screamed, being startled by me. It was a friend who stopped by. Whew! I'm back now....
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Post by Mauveduh » Sat Jul 03, 2004 12:36 am

part 2 is continued in this thread, "Born to be Wild":
http://www.stressbank.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=505
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Post by naynay » Sat Jul 03, 2004 11:22 pm

very interesting stuff. I think it so incredible what we think happened and what really happened. Urban Ledgends...I won't forget how Alfred Hitchcock's movie "The Birds" came about. Or at least what people thought happened to inspire that movie. Flocks of seagulls lost their way in the fog along a beachtown coast. They started smashing into buildings, cars or whatever as they lost their site. It was a few blinded birds...not the scores of screeching and attacking birds that went crazy...as everyone first believed.
All I know, is that I was so afraid of large birds, like crows and seagulls for the longest time.

can't wait for part 2

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Post by Mauveduh » Sun Jul 04, 2004 3:06 pm

Part 2 is at the link above but part 3 still in progress. It got a little long. :L-)
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Post by Mauveduh » Mon Jul 05, 2004 11:33 am

I just heard a story about Marlon Brando. Apparently he was good friends with a mild mannored, quirky little actor, Wally Cox, which seemed like an unlikey friendship in itself. I heard an account from another actor, Shirley Jones, who attended a dinner at Wally's home who said that Marlon sat under the table all night and refused to come out. He was just antisocial and didn't feel like talking to anyone. I can understand that. And you can do that sort of thing to avoid social interaction if you are Marlon Brando.

I also heard a story about him watching TV with his girlfriend when Streetcar Named Desire came on. He instantly said to change the channel but she refused wanting to see it. He complied and after watching himself for awhile, remarked, "God, I was beautiful."

LOL. Yes you were!
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Post by jondy » Wed Jul 07, 2004 6:56 pm

I think that's hilarious about locking yourself out. I've done it too a couple of times. I nearly did it again today as well. For years I've always left a key with one of my neighbours so that if all else fails, I can get him to give me back my key. But once I locked myself out and he'd returned the key to my wife the day before. He was soundly berated for this error in judgement.

You are lucky we weren't reading about you in the news after getting stuck half in and half out of the window. In this neighbourhood you would have been duly photographed and featured on the front page of the community newspaper. Good thing nothing more than your pride was hurt, your absence would leave huge hole in cyberspace.

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Re: He couldda' beena contender-good-bye Marlon

Post by Xylona » Wed Jul 05, 2017 1:03 am

happy to join your community, there are many useful and interesting information!

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